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Volume 4

Transatlantic Perspectives



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The Underground Reader

Sources in the Trans-Atlantic Counterculture

Jeffrey H. Jackson and Robert Francis Saxe

240 pages, bibliog., index

ISBN  978-1-78238-742-8 $110.00/£78.00 Hb Published (June 2015)

eISBN 978-1-78238-743-5 eBook


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Reviews

“An impressive work of outstanding scholarship, The Underground Reader: Sources in the Transatlantic Counterculture… is an exceptionally work of seminal scholarship and very highly recommended, especially for personal and academic library Philosophy collections.” · Midwest Book Review

Description

Every society has rebels, outlaws, troublemakers, and deviants.  This collection of primary sources takes readers on a journey through the intellectual and cultural history of the “underground” in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries.  It demonstrates how thinkers in the US and Europe have engaged in an ongoing trans-Atlantic dialogue, inspiring one another to challenge the norms of Western society. Through ideas, artistic expression, and cultural practices, these thinkers radically defied the societies of which they were part. The readings chart the historical evolution of challenges to mainstream values -- some of which have themselves become mainstream -- from the beginning of the nineteenth century to the present.

Jeffrey H. Jackson is the J.J. McComb Professor of History at Rhodes College and the author of Making Jazz French:  Music and Modern Life in Interwar Paris (Duke UP 2003) and Paris Under Water: How the City of Light Survived the Great Flood of 1910 (Palgrave 2010).

Robert Francis Saxe is Associate Professor of History at Rhodes College and author of Settling Down: World War II Veterans’ Challenge to the Postwar Consensus (Palgrave 2007).

Subject: General Cultural Studies 18th/19th Century History 20th Century History



Contents

Acknowledgments

Introduction

PART I: ROOTS OF A TRANSATLANTIC UNDERGROUND

  • Henri Murger, Scenes of Bohemian Life, 1851
  • Henry David Thoreau, Walden, or Life in the Woods,1854
  • Fyodor Dostoevsky, Notes from Underground, 1864
  • Arthur Rimbaud, “My Bohemian Existence (A Fantasy),” 1870
  • George Du Maurier, Trilby, 1894
  • Alfred Jarry, Ubu Roi, 1896
  • Georges Sorel, Reflections on Violence, 1908
  • F.T. Marinetti, “The Futurist Manifesto,” 1909

PART II: UNDERGROUND HAUNTS: MONTMARTRE AND GREENWICH VILLAGE

  • Theodore Dreiser, A Traveler at Forty, 1913
  • Konrad Bercovici, Around the World in New York, 1924
  • Floyd Dell, “The Rise of Greenwich Village,” 1926
  • Hugo Ball, Flight Out of Time: A Dada Diary,1927

PART III: WAR AND NEW GENERATIONS

  • Malcolm Cowley, Exile’s Return, 1934
  • Michel Leiris, Manhood, 1939
  • Gertrude Stein, Paris France, 1940
  • Sylvia Beach, Shakespeare and Company, 1956

PART IV: BLACK, COOL, AND HIP

  • George Antheil, “Negro on the Spiral, or A Method of Negro Music,” 1934
  • Milton “Mezz” Mezzrow and Bernard Wolfe, Really the Blues, 1946
  • Boris Vian(Vernon Sullivan), I Spit on Your Graves, 1946
  • James Baldwin, “Encounter on the Seine: Black Meets Brown,” 1950
  • Ralph Ellison, Invisible Man, 1952+
  • Norman Mailer, “The White Negro: Superficial Reflections on the Hipster,” 1957
  • Jack Kerouac, The Subterraneans, 1958
  • Franz Fanon, The Wretched of the Earth, 1961

PART V: RETHINKING GENDER AND SEXUALITY

  • Emma Goldman, “Victims of Morality,” 1913
  • Jean Genet, Our Lady of the Flowers, 1943
  • Simone de Beauvoir, The Second Sex, 1949
  • Redstockings of the Women’s Liberation Movement, “The Redstockings Manifesto,” 1969
  • Carl Wittman, “A Gay Manifesto,” 1970

PART VI: CHALLENGERS TO CONFORMITY

  • Herbert Marcuse, Eros and Civilization: A Philosophical Inquiry into Freud,1955
  • Jack Kerouac, Satori in Paris, 1966
  • Hunter S. Thompson, Hell’s Angels: A Strange and Terrible Saga,1966
  • Rudi Dutschke, “The Students and the Revolution,” 1968
  • Tom Wolfe, The Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test, 1968
  • Václav Havel, “Letter to Alexander Dubček,” 1969

Credits
Index

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