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HITLER'S PLANS FOR GLOBAL DOMINATION

Nazi Architecture and Ultimate War Aims

Jochen Thies
Translated by Ian Cooke and Mary-Beth Friedrich
Foreword by Volker R. Berghahn

226 pages, 20 illus., bibliog., index

ISBN  978-0-85745-462-1 $99.00/£60.00 Hb Published (August 2012)

ISBN  978-1-78238-463-2 $24.95/£15.50 Pb Published (September 2014)

eISBN 978-0-85745-463-8 $24.95/£15.50 eBook Published


Hb Pb eBook $24.95
 

“Jochen Thies’s classic [1967] book on Hitler’s plans for world domination is available for the first time in English translation. Despite the huge and burgeoning literature on the Third Reich, the Holocaust, and the Second World War, there is relatively little written on Hitler’s ultimate goals or about the counterfactual: What would have happened if the Wehrmacht had won the campaign against the Soviet Union in the early fall of 1941?...[This] and other questions regarding Hitler’s plans cannot be answered definitely by Thies’s book, but he has given historians a very sound place to start.”  ·  The Historian

“It is high time that this extremely important, well researched, and soundly argued book on the real goals of Adolf Hitler be made accessible to the English-speaking public. At a time when one can still see foolish assertions about his wanting to revise the 1919 peace settlement, it will be especially useful for Americans to read about his concept of world domination and plans to implement it.”  ·  Gerhard Weinberg, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill

What did Hitler really want to achieve: world domination. In the early twenties, Hitler was working on this plan and from 1933 on, was working to make it a reality. During 1940 and 1941, he believed he was close to winning the war. This book not only examines Nazi imperial architecture, armament, and plans to regain colonies but also reveals what Hitler said in moments of truth. The author presents many new sources and information, including Hitler’s little known intention to attack New York City with long-range bombers in the days of Pearl Harbor.

Jochen Thies, born in 1944 in Rauschen/East Prussia, received his PhD in modern history from Freiburg University in 1975. He was a Fellow of the German Historical Institute in London and worked for more than 30 years as a journalist and speech-writer for Chancellor Helmut Schmidt. He has published numerous books and articles in international foreign policy journals.


LC: DD247.H5T48613 2012

BL: YC.2014.a.3877

BISAC: HIS014000 HISTORY/Europe/Germany; HIS027100 HISTORY/Military/World War II; HIS027000 HISTORY/Military/General

BIC: HBJD European history; HBWQ Second World War



Contents

Foreword
Volker R. Berghahn

Part I. Hitler’s Ultimate Goals 1920-1933: Only new ‘Lebensraum’ in the East?

Introduction

Chapter 1. Hitler and his Critics
Chapter 2. Current Research
Chapter 3. Mein Kampf as the Central Source
Chapter 4. Hitler as Builder: Construction Plans, Armaments and a Vision of War
Chapter 5. The Beginnings of a Power Politician. ‘Models’ of Imperial Rule: The Jews and Britain
Chapter 6. No turning back: The Aftermath of September 14, 1930

Part II. Hitler as Architect

Chapter 7. Megalomania as Policy
Chapter 8. Hitler’s Views on Architecture, History and Art
Chapter 9. Buildings and their Functions
Chapter 10. Hitler and his Plans after 1933
Chapter 11. Architecture and the Third Reich
Chapter 12. Summary

Part III. Hitler and Military Issues: from Whale Bay to Lake Erie

Chapter 13. Hitler’s Addresses to German Officers
Chapter 14. The Navy’s Battleship Building Plans and Visions of World Power
Chapter 15. The Me 261/264: Hitler’s Long Range Bomber
Chapter 16. Summary

Part IV. Hitler in 1940-1941: When Visions Become Reality

Chapter 17. Axiomatic Geopolitics: 1950 as the Objective
Chapter 18. The Remaining Powers after a Victory over the USSR

Chapter 19. Hitler’s Path to World Supremacy:
The Military Solution
The Trade War
The “Annexation” of the World

Chapter 20. Ruling the New World
Chapter 21. The British Assessment of Hitler’s Ultimate Goals
Chapter 22. Final Observations on Hitler’s Global Strategy

Acknowledgements
Notes
Bibliography
Index

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