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DANCING CULTURES

Globalization, Tourism and Identity in the Anthropology of Dance

Edited by Hélène Neveu Kringelbach and Jonathan Skinner

236 pages, 11 illus., bibliog., index

ISBN  978-0-85745-575-8 $90.00/£56.00 Hb Published (October 2012)

ISBN  978-1-78238-522-6 $29.95/£18.50 Pb Published (May 2014)

eISBN 978-0-85745-576-5 eBook


Hb Pb
 

The presentation quality of this volume is of a high standard. The photographs are clear and they work well to support to relevant arguments. It is a successful research-oriented volume with very good links between theories and practice in relation to ethnographic studies, tourism, and dance. This book is appropriate and worthwhile for undergraduate and postgraduate students for their in-depth research on social, cultural, and tourism studies. In particular, the excellent case studies in this volume provide insights in to how dance performance is relevant to other different disciplines. Its examples are also relevant for practitioners who work in the creative, culture, and tourism sectors.  ·  Annals of Tourism Research

Dance is more than an aesthetic of life – dance embodies life. This is evident from the social history of jive, the marketing of trans-national ballet, ritual healing dances in Italy or folk dances performed for tourists in Mexico, Panama and Canada. Dance often captures those essential dimensions of social life that cannot be easily put into words. What are the flows and movements of dance carried by migrants and tourists? How is dance used to shape nationalist ideology? What are the connections between dance and ethnicity, gender, health, globalization and nationalism, capitalism and post-colonialism? Through innovative and wide-ranging case studies, the contributors explore the central role dance plays in culture as leisure commodity, cultural heritage, cultural aesthetic or cathartic social movement.

Hélène Neveu Kringelbach is an Oxford Diaspora Programme Researcher at the University of Oxford. Her current research interests include dance and musical theatre in West Africa and beyond, contemporary choreography in Africa and transnational families across Senegal and Europe.

Jonathan Skinner is Senior Lecturer in Social Anthropology at the University of Roehampton. He is the author of Before the Volcano: Reverberations of Identity on Montserrat (Arawak Publications 2004) and co-editor of Great Expectations: Imagination and Anticipation in Tourism (Berghahn Books 2011).

Series: Volume 4, Dance and Performance Studies


LC: GV1588.6.D394 2012

BL: YC.2013.a.12280

BISAC: PER000000 PERFORMING ARTS/General; TRA000000 TRANSPORTATION/General; SOC002010 SOCIAL SCIENCE/Anthropology/Cultural

BIC: AS Dance & other performing arts; JHMC Social & cultural anthropology, ethnography



Contents

Introduction: The Movement of Dancing Cultures
Hélène Neveu Kringelbach and Jonathan Skinner

Part I: Dance and globalisation

Chapter 1. Globalization and the Dance Import/Export Business: The Jive Story
Jonathan Skinner

Chapter 2. Ballet culture and the market: a transnational perspective
Helena Wulff

Chapter 3.  “We’ve got this rhythm in our blood”:  dancing identities in Southern Italy 
Karen Lüdtke

Part II: Tourism, Social Transformation and the Dance

Chapter 4. Performance in tourism: transforming the gaze and tourist encounter at Híwus Feasthouse
Linda Scarangella-McNenly

Chapter 5. Movement on the move: performance and dance tourism
Felicia Hughes-Freeland

Chapter 6. Dance, visibility and representational self-awareness in an Embera community in Panama
Dimitrios Theodossopoulos

Part III: Dance, identity and the nation

Chapter 7. Moving shadows of Casamance: dance and regionalism in Senegal
Hélène Neveu Kringelbach

Chapter 8. Ballet Folklórico Mexicano: choreographing a national identity in a transnational context
Olga Nájera-Ramírez

Chapter 9. Dance, youth and changing gender identities in Korea
Séverine Carrausse

Chapter 10. Preparation, presentation and power: children’s performances in a Balinese dance studio
Jonathan McIntosh

Epilogue: Making culture
Caroline Potter                                                                      

Notes on Contributors
Bibliography
Index           

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