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Virtualism, Governance and Practice

Vision and Execution in Environmental Conservation

Edited by James G. Carrier and Paige West

208 pages, 7 illus., bibliog., index

ISBN  978-1-84545-619-1 $120.00/£85.00 Hb Published (November 2009)

ISBN  978-0-85745-812-4 $29.95/£21.00 Pb Published (December 2012)

eISBN 978-1-84545-960-4 eBook


Hb Pb   Request a Review or Examination Copy (in Digital Format) Recommend to your Library Buy the ebook from these vendors

The chapters in the first section provide rich descriptions of environmental discourses, but the true contribution of Virtualism, governance and practice is found in the second section, which explores the relationship between conservation design and conservation execution... Even if [it does] not answer all of the important  questions, [it] succeeds marvelously in posing them in a clear, provocative manner. [It] would be an excellent addition to courses on environmental discourses and community-based conservation. Even more, [it] would be useful reading for any individual who hopes to contribute to the policy and practice of conservation in the twenty-first century.  ·  Focaal

"This collection is an exciting, important and cutting-edge contribution to the literature from some leading contributors. The individual chapters are well written and provide some fascinating case studies."  ·  Daniel Brockington, Manchester University

"This is an excellent and fascinating study of ethnographic studies and conceptual essays …The breadth and detail of these studies, combined with the excellent conceptual framework provided by editors, make this a highly valuable collection for scholars, policy makers, and applied practitioners."  ·  James Igoe, Dartmouth College

Many people investigating the operation of large-scale environmentalist organizations see signs of power, knowledge and governance in their policies and projects. This collection indicates that such an analysis appears to be justified from one perspective, but not from another. The chapters in this collection show that the critics, concerned with the power of these organizations to impose their policies in different parts of the world, appear justified when we look at environmentalist visions and at organizational policies and programs. However, they are much less justified when we look at the practical operation of such organizations and their ability to generate and carry out projects intended to reshape the world.

James G. Carrier has taught and done research in Papua New Guinea, the United States and Great Britain. For the past decade he has studied the relationship among local fishers, conservationists and the tourism sector in Jamaica. He has published extensively on this research and on environmental protection generally.

Paige West is Tow Associate Professor of Anthropology at Barnard College and Columbia University. She had conducted research on the linkages between environmental conservation and international development, the material and symbolic ways in which the natural world is understood and produced, and production, distribution, and consumption of various commodities. Her work is focused on Papua New Guinea.

Series: Volume 13, Environmental Anthropology and Ethnobiology
Subject: Environmental Studies Development Studies General Anthropology
Area: Latin America Asia-Pacific

LC: GE195 .V57 2009

BL: YK.2011.a.2433

BISAC: SOC002000 SOCIAL SCIENCE/Anthropology/General; NAT011000 NATURE/Environmental Conservation & Protection; SCI030000 SCIENCE/Earth Sciences/Geography

BIC: JHM Anthropology; RNT Social impact of environmental issues




Contents

List of Figures, Tables and Boxes
Preface
List of Abbreviations

Introduction
James G. Carrier and Paige West

Chapter 1. Virtualism and the Logic of Environmentalism
Vassos Argyrou

Chapter 2. New Nature: On the Production of a Paradox
Maarten Onneweer

Chapter 3. A Culture of Conservation: Shaping the Human Element in National Parks
Kathy Rettie

Chapter 4. A Bridge Too Far: The Knowledge Problem in the Millennium Assessment
Colin Filer

Chapter 5. Creolising Conservation: Caribbean Responses to Global Trends in Environmental Management
Tighe Geoghegan

Chapter 6. Uncivil Society: Local Stakeholders and Environmental Protection in Jamaica
Andrew Garner

Chapter 7. ‘The Report Was Written for Money to Come’: Constructing and Reconstructing the Case for Conservation in Papua New Guinea
Flip van Helden

Conclusion: Can the World Be Micromanaged?
Josiah McC. Heyman

Notes on Contributors
Index

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