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VISIONS OF THE END OF THE COLD WAR IN EUROPE, 1945-1990

Edited by Frédéric Bozo, Marie-Pierre Rey, N. Piers Ludlow and Bernd Rother

366 pages, bibliog., index

ISBN  978-0-85745-288-7 $95.00/£56.00 Hb Published (March 2012)

ISBN  978-1-78238-386-4 $37.95/£25.00 Pb Published (February 2014)

eISBN 978-0-85745-370-9 eBook $37.95/£25.00 Published


Hb Pb eBook $37.95
 

[This] superb collection…[is] a unique and valuable contribution to the voluminous literature on the Cold War… Essential.  ·  Choice

These essays give some interesting insight into the minds of their subjects but more importantly achieve the book’s objective of understanding more of the essence of the Cold War and its driving forces… Unlike many such volumes, this book is not merely a collection of different ideas held together loosely by a theme, but a carefully selected group of arguments structured using a combined chronological and thematic approach.  ·  European Review of History—Revue européenne d’histoire

 

This collection succeeds in adding a new aspect to the numerous analyses of the end of the Cold War…This excellent volume brings together, for the first time, a rich and multi-layered panorama of ideas of an alternative world order.  ·  H-Net

The book’s value lies in its multinational and archive-based perspective on individuals and groups who offered ideas on how to end the Cold War. Readers thus receive a panoramic view of the conflict. The book also points the way for future research on the “visions” of other countries, individuals, and institutions not covered here.”  ·  H-France

As this pioneering [volume] clearly and convincingly highlights, perceptions were important, as they influenced foreign policy objectives, international relations and personal chemistry between leaders, strategies for anti-Communist movements and civil society as well as the memory of the Cold War and historical assessments of its leading figures. That the work is able to achieve this through a daunting format that balances 21 separate entries by distinguished scholars in the fields of history, political science and international relations is itself remarkable. The editors must be applauded for organizing the contributions…into a cohesive, chronologically structured work that traces visions of the Cold War from “George Kennan’s Course” to President Ronald Reagan’s American exceptionalism in succinct chapters.”  ·  Reviews & Critical Commentary (Council for European Studies)

This is an excellent collection of articles on an extremely interesting subject. The multinational and multi-archival nature of the selections is very impressive, and it attests to the health and vitality of international relations research in today’s academy.  This is the type of book that should be examined by both policymakers and scholars, since it raises so many good and provocative questions about one of the most important events of our time, namely the end of the Cold War.”  ·  Thomas A. Schwartz, Vanderbilt University

This is an outstanding, well integrated volume that is not only excellent as a history of the Cold War, but focuses on an issue hitherto unexplored in the discussions on the Cold War. [It] is a very good read by some outstanding scholars."  ·  Michael Cox, London School of Economics

"The editors have brought together an intriguing collection of essays. They explore visions of how the Cold War would end; the twist is that all of these visions were articulated before the actual end. The resulting essays shed light not only on the hopes and nightmares of participants, but also on the nature of the Cold War itself."  ·  Mary Elise Sarotte, University of Southern California

Exploring the visions of the end of the Cold War that have been put forth since its inception until its actual ending, this volume brings to the fore the reflections, programmes, and strategies that were intended to call into question the bipolar system and replace it with alternative approaches or concepts. These visions were associated not only with prominent individuals, organized groups and civil societies, but were also connected to specific historical processes or events. They ranged from actual, thoroughly conceived programmes, to more blurred, utopian aspirations — or simply the belief that the Cold War had already, in effect, come to an end. Such visions reveal much about the contexts in which they were developed and shed light on crucial moments and phases of the Cold War.

Frédéric Bozo is Professor of History and International Relations in the Department of European Studies at the Sorbonne (University of Paris III). His publications include Mitterrand, the End of the Cold War, and German Unification (2009) and Two Strategies for Europe: De Gaulle, the United States and the Atlantic Alliance (2001).

Marie-Pierre Rey is Professor of Russian and Soviet History and Director of the Centre of Slavic Studies at the Sorbonne (University of Paris I). Her publications include Alexandre Ier, le tsar qui vainquit Napoléon (2009) and Europe and the End of the Cold War: A Reappraisal (ed., 2008).

N. Piers Ludlow is a Reader in the Department of International History of the London School of Economics. He recently published The European Community and the Crises of the 1960s: Negotiating the Gaullist Challenge (2006).

Bernd Rother is a Historian at the Federal Chancellor Willy Brandt Foundation in Berlin. He is editor of Willy Brandt: Über Europa hinaus. Dritte Welt und Sozialistische Internationale(2006) and Willy Brandt: Gemeinsame Sicherheit. Internationale Beziehungen und deutsche Frage 1982-1992 (2009).

Series: Volume 11, Contemporary European History


LC: D843.V527 2012

BL: YC.2013.a.262

BISAC: HIS037070 HISTORY/Modern/20th Century; HIS010000 HISTORY/Europe/General; POL000000 POLITICAL SCIENCE/General

BIC: HBLW3 Postwar 20th century history, from c 1945 to c 2000; JPH Political structure & processes



Contents

PART I: CRYSTALLIZING THE COLD WAR

Chapter 1. George Kennan's Course, 1947-49: A Gaullist before de Gaulle
John L. Harper

Chapter 2. The Bilderberg Group and the end of the Cold War: The Disengagement Debates of the 1950s
Thomas W. Gijswijt

PART II: STALIN'S DEATH AND AFTER: A MISSED OPPORTUNITY?

Chapter 3. Moscow's Campaign Against the Cold War, 1945-1955
Geoffrey Roberts

Chapter 4. Stalin's Death and Anglo-American Visions of Ending the Cold War, 1953
Jaclyn Stanke

Chapter 5. Soviet Intellectuals after Stalin's Death and Their Visions of the Cold War's End
Vladislav Zubok

PART III: ALTERNATIVE VISIONS OF THE 1960S

Chapter 6. Towards a New Concert of Europe: De Gaulle's Vision of a Post-Cold War Europe
Garret Martin

Chapter 7. Franz Josef Stauß and the End of the Cold War
Ronald J. Granieri

PART IV: A HELSINKI VISION?

Chapter 8. A Very British Vision of Détente: The United Kingdom's Foreign Policy During the Helsinki Process, 1969-1975
Martin D. Brown

Chapter 9. The EC Nine's Vision and Attempts At Ending the Cold War
Angela Romano

PART V: VISIONS AND DISSENT IN THE 1970S

Chapter 10. 'The Transformation of the Other Side': Willy Brandt's Ostpolitik and the Liberal Peace Concept
Gottfried Niedhart

Chapter 11. Neither in One Bloc, Nor in the Other: Berlinguer's Vision of the End of the Cold War
Laura Fasanaro

Chapter 12. Overcoming Bloc Division from Below: Jiří Hájek and the CSCE Appeal of Charter 77
Christian Domnitz

PART VI: VISION OR STATUS QUO IN THE 1970S

Chapter 13. Henry Kissinger: Vision or Status Quo?
Jussi Hanhimäki

Chapter 14. Valéry Giscard d'Estaing and his Vision of the End of the Cold War
Georges-Henri Soutou

PART VII: EVOLUTIONARY VISIONS AND UNEXPECTED RESULTS IN THE 1980S

Chapter 15. Ending the Cold War, Unintentionally
Gregory F. Domber

Chapter 16. Common Security as a Way to Overcome the (Second) Cold War? Willy Brandt's Strategy for Peace in the 1980s
Bernd Rother

Chapter 17. Which Socialism after the Cold War? Gorbachev's Vision and its Impact on the French Left
Marie-Pierre Rey

Chapter 18. Thatcher's Double Track Road to the End of the Cold War: The Irreconcilability of Liberalisation and Preservation
Ilaria Poggiolini

Chapter 19. Mitterand's Vision and the End of the Cold War
Fréderic Bozo

Chapter 20. Visions of Ending the Cold War: Triumphalism and US Soviet Policy in the 1980s
Beth A. Fischer

Chapter 21. The Power of Imagination: How Reagan's SDI Inadvertently Contributed to the End of the Cold War
Marilena Gala

Bibliography

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