Critical Survey

Aims & Scope

Get Email Updates

 





General Editor: Graham Holderness, University of Hertfordshire

Critical Survey addresses central issues of critical practice and literary theory in a language that is clear, concise, and accessible, with a primary focus on Renaissance and Modern writing and culture. The journal combines criticism with reviews and poetry, providing an essential resource for everyone involved in the field of literary studies.

"A superb journal, fast becoming 'required reading', especially for those interested in cutting-edge work in early modern studies." —Barbara Hodgdon, Drake University

"A lively, inventive and eminently readable journal." —Catherine Belsey

Critical Survey is now available on JSTOR!


Subjects: English-language Literature



Current Issue

Volume 25, Issue 3


 

SPECIAL ISSUE: Creating Shakespeare

 

Introduction
GRAHAM HOLDERNESS


ARTICLES

Arabic Adaptations of Shakespeare and Postcolonial Theory
MAHMOUD F. AL-SHETAWI

‘Yes, I have gained my experience’ (As You Like It, 4.3.23): Kenneth Branagh and Adapting the ‘Shakespearean’ Actor
ANNA BLACKWELL


DRAMA

Shakeshafte
ROWAN WILLIAMS


FICTION

The Seeds of Time
GRAHAM HOLDERNESS


POETRY

Perspective
Ghazal: In Situ
RUTH O’CALLAGHAN


NOTES ON CONTRIBUTORS


****

Forthcoming Issues

Volume 26, Issue 1


 

SPECIAL ISSUE: Jane Austen

 

Introduction
PENNY PRITCHARD


ARTICLES

Landscape as Literary Criticism: Jane Austen, Anna Barbauld, and the narratological application of the picturesque
ANNE TONER

Jane Austen’s Mental Maps
JAMES BROWN

Touring With Jane Austen
EMMA SPOONER

Sharing One’s Story and ‘a faithful narrative of every event’
MIKA SUZUKI

Architecture of the Mind and Place in Jane Austen’s Persuasion
REBECCA POSUSTA


NOTES ON CONTRIBUTORS

 


Volume 26, Issue 2


ARTICLES

Sensory Confusion and The Generation Gap in Much Ado About Nothing
PAUL INNES

The Pattern of Parody in Eastward Ho, and a New Date for King Lear
ROGER STRITMATTER AND LYNNE KOSITSKY

The Discipline of Sympathy and the Limits of Omniscience in Nineteenth-Century Journalism
HAZEL MACKENZIE

‘An Arabian in my room’: Shakespeare and the Canon
GRAHAM HOLDERNESS


POETRY

Marvellous Makers: Terrible Destroyers
Anne Stevenson interviewed by Ruth O’Callaghan